JACLYN WRIGHT
JACLYN WRIGHT


Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.



Works from Artifacts
2013-15

In Japan the landscape is often surrounded by elaborate protective structures, made from cloth, straw and wooden beams. These designs are thoughtfully and meticulously put in place. Trees are often wrapped in komomaki, a traditional straw wrapping meant to keep out pests, or found under the umbrella of a yukitsuri, to keep heavy snow from breaking their branches. The desire to carefully control and preserve the landscape is significant to the Japanese aesthetic. Artifacts responds to this line of thought by examining the ways that different cultures, and individuals, preserve objects and ideologies of importance. Through a systematic collection and cataloging of personal artifacts, objects are decontextualized in an attempt for preservation. The still life aesthetic mimics the way in which we archive, catalog, and record information intended for research and study.




Artifacts